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click for Directions to Sandy Bay Marina for Ferry to Rams Island

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SANTA IS COMING TO RAMS ISLAND!!!

After months of negotiations including a visit to the North Pole by RBLNA members and a visit by Santa to Rams Island.

FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY 4th, 5th and 6th December 2015

FRIDAY, SATURDAY and SUNDAY 11th, 12th and 13th December 2015

 

follow below link for sailing times

All aboard the Island Warrior to Rams Island, Santa's Magical Island where Santa Claus will be meeting and greeting children of all ages. Santa Claus will present children with a small gift. Included in the fare there will be kiddies drinks, treats, non alcoholic mulled wine, tea ,coffee and snacks served on the Island. Marshmallow Toasting at a campfire and a short ride aboard the Elf Quad Train to the cottage. Each trip will  last approximately 90 minutes. All Children must be accompanied by an adult. Lifejackets (provided on board) must be worn by children.  Please arrive at Sandy Bay Marina BT28 2 LQ at least 15 minutes before sailing time. Cost from £13.46 per person adult or child. Cancellation only in exceptional circumstances.

Booking Essential

click on link to book

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/santas-magical-island-2015-tickets-18381457434

 

 

 

 

 

VOLUNTEERS WANTED

On Rams Island Lough Neagh

     Himalayan Balsam Bash 

(Non Native Alien Invasive Species Removal)

To Help the Lough Neagh Environment  

SATURDAY 6th June 2015 Volunteers Wanted

Members of Public Welcome

Boat Leaves from Sandy Bay Marina 11a.m.

Light Lunch Provided by River Bann and Lough Neagh Association

Contact email michael@ramsisland.org or telephone 07715368050

Children accompanied by an adult welcome.

Helping the Environment


                Supported by Antrim & Newtownabbey Borough Council 


  Photos from previous events



Its pretty pink flowers are an attractive sight on the Lough’s edge, but Himalayan Balsam is a menace that needs to be stopped in its tracks. On Rams Island particularly at the northern end it has eradicated many of the native species that had established themselves around the small pond and beyond.

Himalayan Balsam is an annual and grows fresh each year from last years seeds germinating in March/April grows up to 2.5 metres high flowering in July and producing over 1000 seeds in Sept /October from each plant. The seeds can be waterborne and have spread all around the Lough.

A bit like a Busy Lizzie on steroids, this native of the Nepalese mountains escaped from the sedate environment of the garden flowerbed. It may be a wonder of nature, but it is a real threat to the wildlife on Lough Neagh.

Once seed-pods have formed, any disturbance will cause them to burst open, hurling seeds with incredible force that can only be compared to projectile vomiting. If you are unfortunate enough to brush against one at eye-level, it could actually damage your eyesight.

The seeds are spat out by a coiled spring mechanism within the seed-pod, which can be seen dangling from the pod afterwards.

Himalayan Balsam has crowded out native plants such as mint (mentha aquatica) and even young willows, which are important food sources for insects (which are themselves a vital part of the Lough’s food-chain). Our local insects seem to find this brash intruder repulsive, and steer clear of it. Any absence of insects means that the whole ecology of the Lough has been damaged.

One (perhaps the only) piece of good news about the Himalayan balsam is that it is incredibly easy to pull up.

Until the Balsam has been eradicated from Rams Island and hopefully Lough Neagh the chances of seeing rare plants such as Irish Lady's-Tresses Orchid (Spiranthes romanzoffiana) are slim indeed.

The Northern Ireland Environment Service have stated in their Natural Heritage Strategic Plan .

“The native flora and fauna of Ireland has developed in post-glacial times and, as an island situated on the edge of the European continent, the natural range of species is limited. This flora and fauna has been supplemented by many introduced species. Protecting our natural species, and their genetic make-up, from the impacts of invasive species or through contamination of unique gene pools is an important biodiversity objective.”

Our plans for Himalayan Balsam will mean complete eradication from the Island and replanting with native species to recover the habitat lost to this species in the last few years. This will not be any easy task as the timing of removal of the plants is crucial as the factors involved are not to disturb any nesting birds but not to leave it too late until seed pods mature as the pods will explode as the plants are being removed and scatter new seed to germinate the following year. Another problem is that the seed can survive for several years. We expect it to take between three and five years to get the Balsam under any sort of Control.

 

            
 

 

 

 

                           To Help Celebrate                   

World Wetlands Day  

On Rams Island Lough Neagh

Postponed by weather from Saturday 31st January2015

new date Saturday 7th February 2015

 Volunteer Litter Lift 

Boat leaves Sandy Bay 11.00a.m.

Details contact Michael

07715368050

email michael@ramsisland.org

Children accompanied by an adult welcome.

This time we are hoping as well as on the Island to get some of the litter

 at one of the sources, at the banks of the Glenavy River.

A family day out on Lough Neagh with light refreshments provided by RBLNAC.

Helping the Environment
                Supported by Antrim Borough Council 

The future of humanity depends on wetlands

They purify and replenish our water, and provide the fish and rice that feed billions. Wetlands act as a natural sponge against flooding and drought, and protect our coastlines. They burst with biodiversity, and are a vital means of storing carbon

Unfortunately, these benefits are not widely known.

Often viewed as wasteland, 64% of our wetlands have disappeared since 1900.

Help us turn the tide on the loss and degradation of our wetlands. Join us for World Wetlands Day 2015 – and beyond!

For more info about World Wetlands Day visit www.ramsar.org

or Wetlands for Our Future

pictures  below from previous  events

 

            
It must be stressed that the litter has been brought to the Island by floods and not left by visitors.  Visitors to the Island are usually very cooperative and do not as a rule leave litter.
 

 

Lough Neagh Secures Funding from Heritage Lottery Fund

details click here

 

 

     Himalayan Balsam Bash 

To Help the Lough Neagh Environment  

FRIDAY 27th June 2014 Volunteers Wanted

Members of Public Welcome

Boat Leaves from Sandy Bay Marina 11a.m.

Light Lunch Provided by River Bann and Lough Neagh Association

Contact email michael@ramsisland.org or telephone 07715368050

Children accompanied by an adult welcome.

Helping the Environment
                Supported by Antrim Borough Council 


On FRIDAY 27th June 2014 the

Rams Island Heritage Project team in Conjunction

with ASDA plan to carry out removal of the invasive species

 plant Himalayan Balsam on Rams Island


  Photos from previous events



Its pretty pink flowers are an attractive sight on the Lough’s edge, but Himalayan Balsam is a menace that needs to be stopped in its tracks. On Rams Island particularly at the northern end it has eradicated many of the native species that had established themselves around the small pond and beyond.

Himalayan Balsam is an annual and grows fresh each year from last years seeds germinating in March/April grows up to 2.5 metres high flowering in July and producing over 1000 seeds in Sept /October from each plant. The seeds can be waterborne and have spread all around the Lough.

A bit like a Busy Lizzie on steroids, this native of the Nepalese mountains escaped from the sedate environment of the garden flowerbed. It may be a wonder of nature, but it is a real threat to the wildlife on Lough Neagh.

Once seed-pods have formed, any disturbance will cause them to burst open, hurling seeds with incredible force that can only be compared to projectile vomiting. If you are unfortunate enough to brush against one at eye-level, it could actually damage your eyesight.

The seeds are spat out by a coiled spring mechanism within the seed-pod, which can be seen dangling from the pod afterwards.

Himalayan Balsam has crowded out native plants such as mint (mentha aquatica) and even young willows, which are important food sources for insects (which are themselves a vital part of the Lough’s food-chain). Our local insects seem to find this brash intruder repulsive, and steer clear of it. Any absence of insects means that the whole ecology of the Lough has been damaged.

One (perhaps the only) piece of good news about the Himalayan balsam is that it is incredibly easy to pull up.

Until the Balsam has been eradicated from Rams Island and hopefully Lough Neagh the chances of seeing rare plants such as Irish Lady's-Tresses Orchid (Spiranthes romanzoffiana) are slim indeed.

The Northern Ireland Environment Service have stated in their Natural Heritage Strategic Plan .

“The native flora and fauna of Ireland has developed in post-glacial times and, as an island situated on the edge of the European continent, the natural range of species is limited. This flora and fauna has been supplemented by many introduced species. Protecting our natural species, and their genetic make-up, from the impacts of invasive species or through contamination of unique gene pools is an important biodiversity objective.”

Our plans for Himalayan Balsam will mean complete eradication from the Island and replanting with native species to recover the habitat lost to this species in the last few years. This will not be any easy task as the timing of removal of the plants is crucial as the factors involved are not to disturb any nesting birds but not to leave it too late until seed pods mature as the pods will explode as the plants are being removed and scatter new seed to germinate the following year. Another problem is that the seed can survive for several years. We expect it to take between three and five years to get the Balsam under any sort of Control.

 

            
 

 


Lough Neagh Secures Funding from Heritage Lottery Fund


30th October 2013


News Release

Multi-million pound boost for Lough Neagh landscape


The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has announced grants¹ of £21million for nine new projects across the UK, with one from Northern Ireland set to receive a multi-million pound boost.

The unique natural, cultural and built heritage of Lough Neagh and its environs is to be explored, protected and enjoyed as part of a major new five-year project which was awarded a £2.58 million grant through HLF’s Landscape Partnership² programme.

Over the last decade the Landscape Partnership programme has provided £160million to protect some of the UK’s most outstanding landscapes. Today’s announcement brings to eight the total number of local landscapes to benefit from HLF funding, and comes just weeks after the award of a £1.6million grant for a new Landscape Partnership scheme in the Glens of Antrim.

In the centre of Northern Ireland, Lough Neagh is bounded by five counties and is the largest freshwater lake in the UK and Ireland. It is a distinct landscape made up of wetland habitat and is home to a wide variety of plant and animal life - it even has its own species of trout (Dollaghan), freshwater herring (Pollan) and the Lough Neagh Fly. The new Landscape Partnership scheme will bring the local lough-shore communities and public bodies together to identify and tackle the needs of this unique landscape in a co-ordinated and practical way. It will include lots of projects to conserve and manage the heritage of the area, and planned activities include the development of a heritage trail along the entire shoreline, archaeological digs and workshops and wetland and peat land conservation.

Paul Mullan, Head of HLF Northern Ireland, said: “The shoreline and islands of Lough Neagh have a distinct landscape character and a rich, but little known heritage. The area is hugely important as a home to a host of wildlife, and for providing a place for people to enjoy water and outdoor activities. It also has a strong community who are keen to play their part in securing the long term future of the Lough, its heritage and economic potential.

“We were delighted to be able to support yet another important piece of Northern Ireland’s diverse and beautiful landscape through our Landscape Partnership programme. Our landscapes are the bedrocks of our heritage, communities and tourism and are worthy of this investment of not only funding but the focus and energy of all the organisations and communities involved in the partnerships.”

Welcoming news of the award, The Honourable Shane O’Neill, Chairman of Lough Neagh Partnership Project, said: “We are delighted that Heritage Lottery Fund has awarded a Landscape Partnership grant to Lough Neagh. Lough Neagh has a very rich and diverse natural, cultural and built heritage and we look forward to developing the project with our partners including RSPB, NIEA, other Government Departments, the seven Councils around the Lough, local communities and the River Bann & Lough Neagh Association."


The nine landscapes receiving support are:

· East Wight, the eastern tip of the Isle of Wight and an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
· Coigach and Assynt, a beautiful and remote part of North West Scotland
· The New Forest , extensive ancient woodland and heathland with a strong surrounding community
· Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland, the largest fresh water lake in the British Isles
· Rusland Valley and Fells, in the South Lake District National Park with a strong link to the traditional coppicing industry
· Derwent Valley, a coalfield area left behind by deindustrialisation which aims to harness the potential of its heritage for positive change and tourism
· Ingleborough Dales, a limestone landscape in the Craven district of the Yorkshire Dales National Park
· Humberhead Levels in South Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire, a rare internationally important wetland landscape characterised by significant remains of medieval strip farming and famous for its peatlands
· North York Moors, home of the pioneering ironstone industry and the early development of railways

Using money raised through the National Lottery, the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) aims to make a lasting difference for heritage, people and communities across the UK and help build a resilient heritage economy. From museums, parks and historic places to archaeology, natural environment and cultural traditions, we invest in every part of our diverse heritage. HLF has supported 35,000 projects with £5.6bn across the UK.
 

 

 

                                Halloween Litter Lift                 

On Rams Island Lough Neagh

Saturday 2nd November 2013

 Volunteer Litter Lift and Tour

Boat leaves Sandy Bay 11.00a.m.

Details contact Michael

07715368050

email michael@ramsisland.org

Children accompanied by an adult welcome.

A family day out on Lough Neagh with light refreshments provided by RBLNAC.

Helping the Environment

Supported by Antrim Borough Council

pictures  from the event

Despite a gloomy weather forecast 27 Volunteers from the public turned up at Sandy Bay for the River Bann and Lough Neagh Association (RBLNA) Shoreline Litter Lift at Rams Island on Saturday 2nd November. After a short boat ride the Volunteers were treated to hot drinks and biscuits on the Island before commencing litter lifting.

The rubbish all along the three mile shoreline of Rams island consisted of almost anything that floats, from empty oil drums, old boots and trainers, polystyrene packaging to empty drink cans and bottles.

The Volunteers worked hard and left the Island Litter free . Lunch for the Volunteers was served aboard the Associations Barge moored at the Island courtesy of RBLNA. The Rams Island Heritage Project is supported by Antrim Borough Council.

The River Bann and Lough Neagh Association is planning another public volunteer litter lift on Saturday 1st February 2014 to help celebrate World Wetlands Day 2014. If you wish to volunteer for this event or to help with other voluntary projects on Rams Island contact Michael Savage on 07715368050 or email michael@ramsisland.org website  Facebook page Rams Island Heritage Project.

 

            
It must be stressed that the litter has been brought to the Island by floods and not left by visitors.  Visitors to the Island are usually very cooperative and do not as a rule leave litter.
 

 

European Heritage Open Days

 

EHOD Rams Island 2013 14th and 15th September

Ferry leaves from Sandy Bay Marina at 12 noon.

BT28 2LQ

Tour on Island Starts at 1 o'clock.

contact warden 07715368050

special fare on ferry £6

 

.     

                                           

click to enlarge

 

 

 

World Wetlands Day Litter Lift

On Rams Island Lough Neagh

Saturday 2nd February 2013

 Volunteer Litter Lift and Tour

Boat leaves Sandy Bay 11.00a.m.

Details contact Michael

07715368050

email michael@ramsisland.org

Helping the Lough Neagh Environment and Celebrating World Wetlands Day

The theme for this year’s World Wetlands Day on 2 February is Wetlands and Water Management.

More info on World Wetlands Day see www.ramsar.org

A family day out on Lough Neagh with light refreshments provided by RBLNAC.

 

 
 
            
It must be stressed that the litter has been brought to the Island by floods and not left by visitors.  Visitors to the Island are usually very cooperative and do not as a rule leave litter.
 

 

 Rams Island Lough Neagh

Sunday 13th January 2013

First Visiting Canoeists of 2013

 

 

 
Jane(Jean) Cardwell Lyttle

Sat 6.10.12

This lady (93 years old) is a grandaughter of Jane and Robert Cardwell the last wardens to live and die on Rams Island in 1931 and 1929 respectively. The ashes of her sister Sadie who lived on the Island with Jane and Robert when she was a child were placed on the Island last year.

 
 

 

 

 

Murphy Family BBQ

CRS ANTRIM Unit Entertain the Murphy Family and Friends on Rams Island
 
 
Joby
Joby Murphy lost his life tragically when he fell in to the river Lagan on the early morning of January 26th 2012.
After four weeks his body was located in the river by expensive sonar equipment that came all the way from mallow in co. Cork. This sonar was donated to the Mallow search and rescue by the O'Tuama family who lost their son in similar circumstances.
The aim of the Joby Murphy trust fund is to raise the money to get sonar equipment for the North of the country.
The importance of this equipment is evident in the frequent loss of life in waterways and the length of time it can take for a family to get their loved ones back. The sonar will thankfully be available to help bring closure to other families who find themselves in such a tragic situation in future.

There should be a link to details of donations and the following information on how to donate -
Ulster bank account Antrim road
Account no: 10616902
Sort code: 98 00 11
 

 

 

Lesser Spotted Ulster

 Broadcast on Monday 17th Sept 2012 8.00p.m. 

watch again on       http://www.u.tv/utvplayer/video/147008

   

  on UTV

Season 14 Episode 7

Joe Mahon visits Lough Neagh, near Belfast, to meet volunteers working to restore the former monastic retreat of Rams Island to its former glory. He also travels to the nearby town of Glenavy, where he hears the story of John Ballance, a local man who emigrated to New Zealand in 1865 - and became its prime minister 26 years later.

 

Filmed in April 2012

 

08 September 2012 - 09 September 2012

An opportunity to visit this intriguing island and learn about its diverse history and wildlife. All of the attractions will be explained in this fascinating tour that includes the new interpretive centre. Bring a picnic. Whilst the tour on the Island is free visitors will have to make their own way to the Island. A ferry operated by the Rams Island Heritage Project will leave from Sandy Bay Marina at 12noon.

 

 

Broadcast originally  on BBC1 N.I. then repeated on BBC2 N.I.

Dig WW2 with Dan Snow

  link to bbc iplayer http://www.bbc.co.uk/i/b01jc67j/?t=17m31s

During WW2 USAAF personnel from the American base at Langford Lodge took time off to relax on Rams Island. Made a change from working on Lightnings, Thunderbolts and Liberators etc. Some of the visitors carved their names and home states on the Beech trees. At the start of WW2 a detachment of Belgian Troops were actually stationed on the Island. A television crew from 360 Productions filmed Dan Snow British Television presenter on Friday evening 5th August 2011 for a series of historical programmes on WW2 to be aired by the BBC. Surrounded by airfields and with the famous Sandy Bay Flying boat base Lough Neagh and Rams Island played a large background role in the war effort. This was mainly training, servicing and armament production.

 

 

 

Pamela McCulloch BBQ
A family get together on Rams Island

 

Island Warrior Carries Olympic Flame

 

The Rams Island Ferry Island Warrior carried the Olympic Flame across Lough Neagh

 from Antrim to Ballyronan on Thursday 07/06/2012

 

 

 

Himalayan Balsam Bash
On Tuesday 19th June, as part of EU Sustainability Week, staff from Coca-Cola HBC  teamed up with the Rams Island Heritage Project and TIDY NI to carry out a litter lift and removal of the invasive plant Himalayan Balsam. 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Glenavy Development Partnership BBQ

Sunday 10.06.12

 

 

 

Island Warrior Carries Olympic Flame

The Rams Island Ferry Island Warrior carried the Olympic Flame across Lough Neagh

 from Antrim to Ballyronan on Thursday 07/06/2012

 

 

 

 

Broadcast on BBC 1 N.I.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/i/b01jc67j/  a short poignant piece about the trees on Rams link is to BBC Iplayer

 

www.bbc.co.uk

Dan Snow reveals how the dramatic surrender of the German U-boat fleet came about

We now have a broadcast date for Dig WW2, part of which was filmed with Dan Snow last summer on Rams Island. The first episode will air on Monday, May 14, 21:00 on BBC 1 NI. The following two episodes will play the following Mondays.

During WW2 USAAF personnel from the American base at Langford Lodge took time off to relax on Rams Island. Made a change from working on Lightnings, Thunderbolts and Liberators etc. Some of the visitors carved their names and home states on the Beech trees. At the start of WW2 a detachment of Belgian Troops were actually stationed on the Island. A television crew from 360 Productions filmed Dan Snow British Television presenter on Friday evening 5th August for a series of historical programmes on WW2 to be aired by the BBC. Surrounded by airfields and with the famous Sandy Bay Flying boat base Lough Neagh and Rams Island played a large background role in the war effort. This was mainly training, servicing and armament production.

 

Ellie Harrison and the film crew from Countryfile filming with the Volunteers on Rams Island 

BBC One  Sunday June 3rd 18:30
 

 

Joe Mahon and his crew filming on Rams for Lesser Spotted Ulster

To be broadcast during the Autumn of 2012 on UTV

 

 

 

A short video about the Woodcarvings on the Island

 

Woodcarver from Rams Island on Vimeo.

 

Another two videos of the Interpretive Centre JK16 Sandmartin on Vimeo taking us from the launch to the fitout in 2008 and 2009 with a recap from 2004 click to view.

 

 

 

2 February each year is World Wetlands Day. It marks the date of the adoption of the Convention on Wetlands on 2 February 1971, in the Iranian city of Ramsar on the shores of the Caspian Sea. Each year since 1997, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and groups of citizens at all levels of the community have taken advantage of the opportunity to undertake actions aimed at raising public awareness of wetland values and benefits in general, and the Ramsar Convention in particular.

 

World Wetland Day Celebrations

On Rams Island Lough Neagh

Saturday 4th February 2012

 Volunteer Litter Lift and Tour

Boat leaves Sandy Bay 11.00a.m.

Details contact Michael

07715368050

email michael@ramsisland.org

A family day out on Lough Neagh with light refreshments provided by RBLNAC accompanied children welcome.

click for event pictures

 

  The Snowdrop litter lift on Saturday, 26 February 2011 has left the Island completely litter free. This meets one of our goals set in 2004.Well done all who helped with all the hard work over the last two months and during previous winters. A great effort by all concerned!

Rams Island is now litter free.

click here for more details

 

Lough Neagh Celebrates

WORLD WETLANDS DAY 2011

As part of the Annual World Wetlands Day  Events the River Bann and Lough Neagh Association are holding  Litter Lifts on Rams Island.

 

2 February 2011

World Wetlands Day

click for leaflet

 

 

 

 

Balsam Bashers Rams Island

thanks to Jack Bingham jnr

 

 

Autumn/ Winter 2010/2011

Volunteer Work Programme

volunteers winter 2009/2010 click to enlarge

Click Here for Rams Island Volunteer Programme Details

 

European Heritage Open Days

Click Here for Rams Island Event Details

 

The principles of leave no trace are very relevant on Rams Island, we have a no dogs policy except guide dogs and of course no camping during the breeding season.

The Seven Principles of Leave No Trace

The Leave No Trace programme is designed to help outdoor enthusiasts value the natural environment, to understand the impact of their activities, and to enable them to make decisions to minimise that impact while still enjoying their activities with freedom.

  1. Plan Ahead and Prepare
  2. Be Considerate of Others
  3. Respect Farm Animals and Wildlife
  4. Travel and Camp on Durable Ground
  5. Leave What You Find
  6. Dispose of Waste Properly
  7. Minimise the Effects of Fire
Practising a Leave No Trace ethic is very simple: Make it hard for others to see or hear you and LEAVE NO TRACE of your visit.

 

 

Charity Canoe Trip

18 paddlers paddling for 3 days from Antrim to Castlerock via Lough Neagh and the Lower Bann.

The crew from the Rams Island project will be accompanying the paddlers across Lough Neagh in the Island Warrior.

08 April 2010 to 10 April 2010

 

 

The United Nations declared 2010 to be the International Year of Biodiversity. It is a celebration of life on earth and of the value of biodiversity for our lives. The world is invited to take action in 2010 to safeguard the variety of life on earth: biodiversity
 

 

The River Bann & Lough Neagh Association Co has produced a guide for the two major Islands of Lough Neagh, Coney Island and Rams Island.
48 pages of information about the flora and fauna, history and a small hint of scandal.

Its available now for £6 plus £1.50p&p

 

also available for local pickup

email: michael@ramsisland.org

 

New Marina

www.sandybaymarinaloughneagh.com/

A  new 60 Berth Marina
 has just been opened by Sandy Bay Marina Ltd at 17a Shore Road, Lough Neagh opposite Rams Island.

This is the main access point for Rams Island via the River Bann & Lough Neagh Association passenger vessel Island Warrior(07715368050)


Further details about the new marina can be obtained by calling Eastwood Estate Agents, Lisburn tel: 9266 5870 or alternatively, out of hours, mobile: 07801 439 435.

 

 

The Lough Neagh Website

Discover Lough Neagh

www.discoverloughneagh.com

 

Work on New Jetty Started 1st September 2007

Rams Island Volunteer Team would like to apologise for the inconvenience caused to visitors while the construction of the new jetty takes place. We are working as quickly as possible in our spare time and hope to have the jetty completed over the winter months.

Update Sept 2009 72 metres (240feet) of jetty in completed

 

Watch progress on  Channel  RAMSISLAND

 

 

 

New Website

www.glenavyhistory.com

A very interesting site about the history of the area

including Rams Island

http://www.glenavyhistory.com/townlands/ramsIsland.html

 

Operation Overlord

Over the winter months 2006/7 Volunteers have been working long hours mainly at weekends to deliver materials and equipment to the Island for the upgraded paths, fencing and for the new jetty before the start of the nesting season.  All are in place and work will start on the new jetty in the near future, with the work on the Island restarting after the nesting season.        pictures click here

 

Sunday 6th August 2006 Wedding on Rams Island

On Sunday the sixth of August a bride and groom fulfilled their dreams by getting married on Rams Island.

click here for photos and details

 

ISLAND WARRIOR

click for more details

Island Warrior is a licensed passenger boat for ferrying volunteers and the public to Rams Island.

Island Warrior is  also available for charter anywhere on Lough Neagh.

 

Saturday 22nd October Bluebell Planting

In a event organised by RBLNAC in conjunction with Antrim Community Forum 38 children and adults from Antrim planted five hundred native bluebell bulbs (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) on Rams Island.click here for photos  click here for photos   click here for photos  click here for photos

 

Saturday 6th August Rams Island Rally

25 Boats arrived from Sandy Bay, Morrows Point, Battery Harbour,

Antrim and Kilrea

click here for photos  click here for photos   click here for photos  click here for photos

 

Saturday 25th June Himalayan Balsam Bash on Rams Island

click here for photos  click here for photos   click here for photos  click here for photos

 

RBLNA  have become an Associate Group of the Conservation Volunteers. This will help to progress the Rams Island Heritage Project.

click on CVNI logo to visit website.

 

RBLNA has made an application  for funding to restore the jetty at Rams Island and to undertake restoration work on the Island. Any members wishing to become involved in this project  or anyone wanting further information contact Michael Savage on 07715368050 or to email Michael click here

 

Click on Paradise Lost to download an Article by Michael Savage published in Inland Waterways News

Paradise Lost

 

 

Ram’s Island Heritage Project

Join Us in this project

Ram's Island is located approximately one mile offshore from Lennymore Bay and Sandy Bay on the Eastern Shore of Lough Neagh. Rams is the largest island on Lough Neagh. Lough Neagh was designated as an Area of Special Scientific Interest (ASSI), a Special Protection Area and a Ramsar site in 1992, 1996 and 1976 respectively.  It has been suggested that Rams was formed as a Glacial Esker. It is nearly one mile long by a quarter of a mile wide at the widest southern end. Notable features of the Island are a round tower (a scheduled ancient monument 58:16, the remains of a Celtic Monastic Settlement about a thousand years old) and the ruins of the O’Neill’s’ nineteenth century summer house. The Island was last permanently inhabited in the 1920s by the Cardwell family who were caretakers for the O’Neill’s. The remains of Cardwell’s harbour, left dry by the lowering of Lough Neagh, can be seen near the ruins of Cardwell’s little house. The Island has quite a number of mature deciduous trees including Oak, Ash, Alder, Willow, Birch, Beech, Sycamore, Lime, Horse Chestnut, and unusually Walnut. There are Yew, Snowdrops, Bluebells, Primrose, Lords and Ladies (Jack in the Pulpit), Wild Mint, Wild Garlic, Lesser Celandine, Ferns and a carpet of Daffodils, depending on the season. Fungi such as Scarlet Elf’s Cap and Jelly Ear can also be found. There are also various Mosses and Lichens. Although overgrown, there are remains of a carriageway along the elevated central spine of the island. There are overgrown paths along the entire length of the Island. Its remote, wilderness and ‘lost in time’ qualities make Ram’s a pleasant and attractive place to visit.

 

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This site was last updated 03-Sep-2015